Tag Archives: ww2

Absolute Hell, National Theatre

The original version of Rodney Ackland’s provocative work, The Pink Room, had a bruising reception back in 1952, losing thousands for investor Terence Rattigan amidst furious reviews. Since salvaged by the Orange Tree in the Eighties, its rebirth was cemented by … Continue reading

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The Slaves of Solitude, Hampstead Theatre

We’re back in the world of ration books, blackouts and spam fritters, as Nicholas Wright delves into the home front via his adaptation of Patrick Hamilton’s 1947 novel. Though there’s a certain period chintz about Jonathan Kent’s production, darker undercurrents make this a more … Continue reading

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BWW Interview: Fenella Woolgar

The actress discusses The Slaves of Solitude, the stage adaptation of Patrick Hamilton’s novel, at Hampstead Theatre. Read my full BroadwayWorld interview here

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Harvey, Theatre Royal Haymarket

If insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results, repeatedly unfunny Harvey isn’t just a study of madness, but a punishing example of it. Mary Chase’s dusty 1944 farce about a man hallucinating a 6ft 3in rabbit … Continue reading

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Festival fun, D-Day, Curious Incident and charitable cars

In my Compass magazine Arts pages this month: Tastings, tea parties, markets and awards at the Bridport Food Festival D-Day commemoration in Portsmouth Visit a fundraising car exhibition See the award-winning Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time Catch exciting work by young dancers Plus my … Continue reading

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Solid Miller is lacking darkness

‘It’s gonna rain tonight,’ predicts All My Sons protagonist Joe Keller. As one, the Regent’s Park audience turned their gaze to a threatening sky. Thankfully, we were spared a deluge, but it highlighted a problem with this venue. Arthur Miller’s masterful study of corrosive … Continue reading

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Powerful tale lost as tensions evaporate in open air venue

‘It’s gonna rain tonight,’ predicts All My Sons protagonist Joe Keller. As one, the Regent’s Park audience turned their gaze to a threatening sky. Thankfully, we were spared a deluge, but it highlighted a problem with this venue. Arthur Miller’s masterful study … Continue reading

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Verse drama about deception is incoherent

How apt that Peter Oswald’s play should coincide with Shakespeare’s 450th birthday. Undoubtedly, the Bard is a touchstone for this unwieldy epic. And yet the comparison does Lucifer Saved at the Lion & Unicorn no favours. The master communicates universal themes … Continue reading

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